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In The Americas with David Yetman

In The Americas with David Yetman

IN THE AMERICAS WITH DAVID YETMAN takes a fresh look at the lands that make up much of the Western Hemisphere. The 10-part series showcases the landscapes, peoples and history of the Americas - from the stories of a small village of Japanese immigrants in the Amazon to descendants of poor Italians in Chile, from Mayan temples in Guatemala to ancient fortresses in Mexico, and from the frigid, glacier-carved barrens of northern Canada to the timeless villages of the altiplano in Peru. By raft, boat, ferry, horse and motorcycle, host David Yetman journeys to parts of Cuba mostly unknown to the outside world, the wild mountains of western Argentina, festivals in Columbia and the often ignored Great Lakes of the United States. Along the way, he meets people from all walks of life - natives and immigrants, islanders and mainlanders, pastoralists and city-dwellers - and hears their stories. David Yetman, longtime host of The Desert Speaks (also distributed through APT Exchange) works as a research social scientist at the Southwest Center of the University of Arizona. Yetman is also a nationally known author of numerous books and articles and an accomplished photographer.

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In this episode, David visits two of Alaska's vast national parks, Lake Clark and Katmai, each with a heritage of volcanic activity. Their thriving ecosystems illustrate nature's ability to recover from cataclysmic events. The villages of Native Americans continue as well, along with their traditions.

Argentines maintain that Patagonia begins at the Rio Colorado in the Province of Neuquen. Traveling south, they cross that river on Ruta 40 (Route Forty) in a volcanic landscape amidst a vast desert, the majestic peaks of the Andes always present on the right. Within the slopes of the Andes are myriad lakes and towns constructed by European immigrants and expatriates, but never far from the arid, windswept steppes of Patagonia. More secluded are the Mapuches - Indians who resisted the European onslaught and today struggle to retain their culture.

African-Brazilians provided Brazil with internationally renowned cultural symbols: samba and carnival. The center of African-Brazilian culture is the city of Salvador in the state of Bahia. Its connection to Africa-physical and cultural--helps us to understand the distinct cultural and culinary contributions from this vibrant repository of African influence, and to recognize the heritage of slavery.

Bogota serves as Colombia's capital and its social, cultural and economic center. To help decrease traffic congestion and air pollution, Bogotans created an extremely effective mass transit system called Cyclovia: each Sunday they cordon off their downtown and turn it over to bicyclists and pedestrians. While traveling to Zona Cafetera, the source of most Colombian coffee, David explores the history of the world's most popular beverage.

From the urban capital city of Bogota and its famous cicolvia dedicated to bicycles, this sprawling nation offers an unexpected variety of cultures and urban landscapes. David and his team hop from the mountains to the extreme southern tip of the country to see wildlife and to visit indigenous villages of the people who live in the heart of the Amazon jungle.

WGBY Create
Wed Mar 7th, 9:30am
Wed Mar 7th, 3:30pm

Far inland from the tropical beaches of Brazil's Bahia state lies an ancient escarpment that juts up into Bahia's vast interior. Host David Yetman takes us on a tour of the Chapada Diamantina, once a rich source of diamonds, now an increasingly popular recreational region. The sheer cliffs and steep mountainsides intercept moisture from the distant Atlantic. The resultant rainfall brings flows into the arid sertao and waters the great swamp where runaway slaves hid from their owners.

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