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Changing Seas

Changing Seas

CHANGING SEAS takes viewers on an exciting adventure to the heart of our liquid planet. The documentary series offers an unprecedented look at how oceanographers and experts study earth's vast underwater wilderness, while shedding light on how over-fishing, global climate change and pollution threaten ocean resources.

Latest Episodes

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https://video.pbs.org/widget/partnerplayer/3002314904/?player=WGBY-PBS&w=512&h=288&chapterbar=true&autoplay=false Mexico’s remote Revillagigedo Archipelago is a hotspot for oceanic mantas. Scientists are studying the local population using photo ID techniques and acoustic tags which track the movements of these mysterious fish. They are also conducting experiments to see if the filter-feeding rays are impacted... /episodes/get/57873 /episode/57873 Majestic Mantas /episode-player/57873

The remote Revillagegdo Archipelago off Mexico's Pacific coast is a hotspot for giant mantas that interact with awe-struck scuba divers. Scientists are studying the local population using photo ID techniques and acoustic tags which track the movements of these mysterious fish. They are also conducting experiments to see if the filter-feeding rays are impacted negatively by microplastics, tiny pieces of toxic trash that float in the ocean.

Air date:
Wed, 06/28/2017 - 12:00
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https://video.pbs.org/widget/partnerplayer/3002314679/?player=WGBY-PBS&w=512&h=288&chapterbar=true&autoplay=false For millennia, the exchange of CO2 between the oceans and atmosphere has been in balance. Now, with more anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, the oceans are taking up more CO2   as well. This additional CO2 is negatively impacting sensitive ecosystems and scientists worry how changes to... /episodes/get/57872 /episode/57872 The Fate of Carbon /episode-player/57872

For millennia, the exchange of CO2 between the oceans and atmosphere has been in balance. Now, with more anthropogenic carbon-dioxide in the atmosphere, the oceans are taking up more CO2 as well. This additional CO2 is negatively impacting sensitive ecosystems through a process called ocean acidification, and scientists worry how changes to the ocean environment will affect the way carbon is cycled through the seas.

Air date:
Wed, 06/28/2017 - 12:00
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https://video.pbs.org/widget/partnerplayer/3002101619/?player=WGBY-PBS&w=512&h=288&chapterbar=true&autoplay=false It is estimated there will be two billion more people on the planet by mid-century. To feed this booming world population, more fish will need to be farmed than ever before. One way to increase fish production in a sustainable way is to move aquaculture operations offshore – where there is plenty... /episodes/get/57770 /episode/57770 The Future of Seafood /episode-player/57770

It is estimated there will be two billion more people on the planet by mid-century. To feed this booming world population, more fish will need to be farmed than ever before. One way to increase fish production in a sustainable way is to move aquaculture operations offshore - where there is plenty of available space and strong currents flush out the pens to avoid polluting sensitive ecosystems.

Air date:
Wed, 06/21/2017 - 12:00
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https://video.pbs.org/widget/partnerplayer/3002101897/?player=WGBY-PBS&w=512&h=288&chapterbar=true&autoplay=false Water releases from Lake Okeechobee periodically create putrid mats of blue green algae. Scientists think water pollution is to blame, and if something isn’t done about it there could be irreparable damage to the environment, the local economy and people’s health. /episodes/get/57771 /episode/57771 Toxic Algae: Complex Sources and Solutions /episode-player/57771

Lake Okeechobee was once the blue heart of Florida, pumping fresh water down to the Everglades and beyond. But now that a dike and canal system control its flow, water releases from the lake periodically create putrid mats of blue green algae. Scientists think water pollution is to blame, and if something isn't done about it there could be irreparable damage to the environment, the local economy and people's health.

Air date:
Wed, 06/21/2017 - 12:00
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https://video.pbs.org/widget/partnerplayer/2365792333/?player=WGBY-PBS&w=512&h=288&chapterbar=true&autoplay=false In the remote Pacific, the Maug Islands rise out of the sea. Formed by an ancient volcano, shallow hydrothermal vents are found close to corals here. These vents emit levels of CO2 that can be expected in the world’s oceans by the end of the century, making these waters a natural lab for scientists... /episodes/get/50106 /episode/50106 Maug’s Caldera: A Natural Laboratory /episode-player/50106

This episode takes viewers into an area of the remote Pacific, the islands of Maug. Formed by an ancient volcano, shallow hydrothermal vents are found close to coral reefs inside the submerged caldera. These vents emit levels of CO2 that can be expected in the world's oceans by the end of the century, making these waters a natural laboratory for scientists studying the impacts of ocean acidification on coral reefs.

Air date:
Mon, 06/27/2016 - 12:00
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https://video.pbs.org/widget/partnerplayer/2365787905/?player=WGBY-PBS&w=512&h=288&chapterbar=true&autoplay=false Every winter, hundreds of manatees aggregate near Crystal River, Florida, attracted by the warmer, clear waters. This sanctuary is also a treasure for scientists, who take advantage of these manatee gatherings to study them. From decades of visual ID studies to the most cutting-edge DNA research,... /episodes/get/49921 /episode/49921 Manatees: Conserving a Marine Mammal /episode-player/49921

Every winter, hundreds of manatees aggregate at Crystal River, Florida. This sanctuary is also a treasure for scientists, who take advantage of these manatee gatherings to study them. From decades of visual ID studies to the most cutting-edge DNA research, experts hope that science will help conserve this beloved marine mammal.

Air date:
Mon, 06/20/2016 - 12:00
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